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The prologue to St. John’s gospel introduces God’s Son as the Word. This life-giving Word—spoken down through the ages—became flesh and lived in our midst. For all of Christian history, the Word is intimately connected with all of human life. It is the purpose of TWIL (“The Word Is Life”) to bring the gospel to life and to bring life to the gospel. This blog will feature reflections on the Sunday Scriptures from contemporary Catholic writers, words of wisdom for our Spiritual journey from saints and blessed, and thoughtful reflections on masterpieces of sacred art. We at Living with Christ hope that they will help you grow in your spiritual life and deepen your relationship with the Word, our Lord Jesus Christ.

I have neighbors who came here five years ago from a repressive dictatorship. They have overcome many hurdles—learning English, finding their way in our society, and finding employment. I am impressed by their appreciation for our democracy. After they became citizens, they were eager to vote. They are politically involved. They attend meetings to learn the positions of the parties and to urge fair treatment for those who are disadvantaged. These neighbors put many of the rest of us citizens to shame.

Today, we hear the prophet Amos preaching against the unjust treatment of the poor and needy. There’s a tendency to think we can be good Christians without being politically involved, but both the Hebrew and the Christian Scriptures are full of political commentary and exhortation. These texts are the basis of Catholic social teaching. This teaching is meant to be well integrated into our lives, so that social justice issues guide our daily choices, including our politics.

In his letter to Timothy, Paul calls on the early Christians to pray for kings and all in high places. Still today, as in Paul’s day, many people have no choice as to who holds authority over them. We in democratic countries have the responsibility of helping guide the policies of political parties and governments toward social justice. That includes being political aware and involved and taking our right to vote seriously. Let us embrace and rejoice in this sacred privilege and call.

Beth Porter

Author: Living with Christ

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Our sacred priviledge

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I have neighbors who came here five years ago from a repressive dictatorship. They have overcome many hurdles—learning English, finding their way in our society, and finding employment. I am impressed by their appreciation for our democracy. After they became citizens, they were eager to vote. They are politically involved. They attend meetings to learn the positions of the parties and to urge fair treatment for those who are disadvantaged. These neighbors put many of the rest of us citizens to shame.

Today, we hear the prophet Amos preaching against the unjust treatment of the poor and needy. There’s a tendency to think we can be good Christians without being politically involved, but both the Hebrew and the Christian Scriptures are full of political commentary and exhortation. These texts are the basis of Catholic social teaching. This teaching is meant to be well integrated into our lives, so that social justice issues guide our daily choices, including our politics.

In his letter to Timothy, Paul calls on the early Christians to pray for kings and all in high places. Still today, as in Paul’s day, many people have no choice as to who holds authority over them. We in democratic countries have the responsibility of helping guide the policies of political parties and governments toward social justice. That includes being political aware and involved and taking our right to vote seriously. Let us embrace and rejoice in this sacred privilege and call.

Beth Porter

Author: Living with Christ

Leave a Comment: